top of page

Bird species extinct since 1492

Quick search: A B C D E F G H I JK L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
A

1. Acrocephalus astrolabii (Yap Reed Warbler)

  • Origin: Yap / Micronesia

  • Year of extinction: 1838 or 1839

  • Reason of extinction:
     

2. Acrocephalus luscinius (Guam Reed Warbler)

  • Origin: Guam

  • Year of Extinction: 1969

  • Reason for Extinction: The species probably became extinct due to habitat (wetland) destruction, hunting by the brown tree snake, fires, and use of pesticides.
     

3. Acrocephalusmusae

  • Origin: Raiatea and Huahine / French Polynesia

  • Year of Extinction: early 19th century

  • Reason of extinction:  The species probably died out due to introduced species such as rats, domestic cats and

     different birds.
 

4. Acrocephalus nijoi

  • Origin: Aguijan / Northern Mariana Islands

  • Year of Extinction: 1995, but possibly earlier.

  • Reason for Extinction: Introduced animal species such as rats, domestic cats and possibly also Pacific monitor lizards probably contributed to the extinction of this species.
     

5. Acrocephalus yamashinae

  • Origin: Pagan / Northern Mariana Islands

  • Year of extinction: no later than 1981, possibly

     even in the 1960s

  • Reason for Extinction: The species was probably weakened by introduced pets and human spread on the island, the eruption of Mount Pagan then also destroyed the last remaining habitats of the species, which may have led to the extinction. However, it is also very possible that the species was already extinct before the volcanic eruption in 1981.
     

Acrocephalus_luscinius_crop.jpg

Acrocephalus luscinius

Acrocephalus_caffer_musae.jpg

Acrocephalus musae

6. Aegolius gradyi

  • Origin: Bermuda

  • Year of extinction: The species may not have died out until the 17th century, it is only known from fossil finds

  • Reason for Extinction: It is believed that habitat destruction and the introduction of predators and competing species to the island led to the extinction of the species.
     

7. Akialoa ellisiana

  • Origin: Island of O'ahu in Hawaii / USA

  • Year of extinction: 1837, unconfirmed sighting from 1840

  • Reason for Extinction: The species most likely became extinct due to habitat destruction and disease.
     

Akialoa_ellisiana.png

Akiola ellisiana

8. Akialoa lanaiensis

  • Origin: Lana'i Island of Hawaii / USA + Moloka'i and Maui also Hawaii only known as a fossil

  • Year of extinction: 1892

  • Reason for Extinction: The species probably became extinct due to habitat destruction, disease and possibly introduced species.
     

9. Akialoa obscura

  • Origin: Main Island of Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: 1940

  • Reason for the extinction: The reasons for the extinction were probably the destruction of the habitat and pathogens brought to the island by mosquitoes.
     

10. Akialoa stejnegeri

  • Origin: Island of Kaua'i in Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: 1969

  • Reason for extinction: The species probably died out due to habitat destruction, diseases, but probably also due to introduced predators and hurricanes.
     

11. Alectroenas nitidissimus

  • Origin: Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction: About 1832

  • Reason for extinction: The species became extinct due to hunting and probably habitat destruction.
     

12. Alectroenas payandeei

  • Origin: Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction: Probably 1690s

  • Reason for Extinction: Because of its location, Mauritius was often hit by ships bringing rats with them, which probably also led to the extinction of the species.
     

13. Alopecoenas ferrugineus (Tanna ground pigeon)

  • Origin: Tanna / Vanuatu

  • Year of extinction: 1774

  • Reason for Extinction: The species probably became extinct due to overhunting.
     

431px-Alectroenas_nitidissima-John_Gerra

Alectroenas nitidissimus

TannaGroundDove.jpg

Alopecoenas ferrugineus

14. Alopecoenas salamonis (San Cristobal pigeon)

  • Origin: Makira and Ramos Islands / Solomon Islands

  • Year of Extinction: 1927

  • Reason for Extinction: Introduced rats, cats and habitat destruction most likely led to the extinction of the species. Abandoned pigs and dogs are also native to Makira, which could have caused additional damage to the species.
     

15. Alopochen kervazoi  

  • Origin:  Reunion

  • Year of Extinction: Between 1671 and 1710

  • Reason for Extinction: The species probably became extinct due to hunting of the species and destruction of its habitat.
     

16. Alopochen mauritiana  

  • Origin: Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction:  1693

  • Reason for extinction: Probably the species fell victim to hunting by humans.
     

17. Amazona martinicana  (Martinique Amazon)

  • Origin: Martinique

  • Year of Extinction: Last sighting in 1779 and probably extinct before 1800.

  • Reason for Extinction: Excessive hunting by humans probably led to the extinction of the species.
     

424px-Extinctbirds1907_P18_Amazona_marti

Amazona martinicana

18. Amazona violacea (Violet Amazon)

  • Origin:  Guadeloupe

  • Year of Extinction: Last sighting 1779, the species probably became extinct shortly thereafter.

  • Reason for Extinction: Most likely, the species became extinct due to very heavy hunting by humans.
     

19. Anas marecula  (Amsterdamen)

  • Origin: Amsterdam Island in the Indian Ocean south-east of Africa.

  • Year of extinction: 1793

  • Reason for Extinction: The Amsterdam duck was hunted by whalers who stopped on the island. This most likely led to the extinction of the species.
     

20. Anas theodori (Mauritian duck)

  • Origin: Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction:  1696

  • Reason for Extinction: Presumably, excessive human persecution led to the extinction of the  Mauritius duck.
     

21. Anthornis melanocephala  (Chatham Bell Honeyeater)

  • Origin: Chatham Islands / New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: Last sighting in 1906

  • Reason for Extinction: The extinction of the species was probably brought about by several reasons. These include the destruction of the habitat, introduced animal species such as rats and cats and hunting by humans for specimens in zoological collections.
     

22. Aphanapteryx bonasia  (Mauritius rail)

  • Origin: Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction:  1693

  • Reason for extinction: Due to its inability to fly and the allegedly good taste of its meat, the Mauritius rail was hunted for consumption. In addition, introduced cats also hunted Mauritius rails, which together may have led to the extinction of the species.
     

23. Aplonis corvina (Kosrae singstar)

  • Origin:   Kosrae / Micronesia

  • Year of Extinction: Last Collected Specimens  In 1828, in 1880 (next visit to the island) no more animals could be found.

  • Reason for the extinction: The rats, which are common on the island and were probably brought in by whalers, probably led to the extinction of the species.
     

800px-Extinctbirds1907_P17_Amazona_viola

Amazon violacea

435px-Aphanapteryx_bonasiaIbis1869P007AA

Aphanapteryx bonasia

24. Aplonis fusca (Norfolk Starling)

  • Origin: islands  Norfolk and Lord Howe / Australia

  • Year of Extinction: Last sighting of the year  1923

  • Reason for Extinction: The population on Lord Howe probably died out  by introduced house rats, whereas on the then rat-free island of Norfolk habitat destruction was more of a reason  of extinction to be seen by the Norfolk Star.
     

25. Aplonis mavornata (single starling)

  • Origin: Mauke / Cook Islands

  • Year of Extinction: Last sighting in 1825

  • Reason for the extinction: Presumably introduced rats led to the extinction of the species.
     

26. Aplonis ulietensis (Raiateastar)

  • Origin: Raiatea Island / French Polynesia 

  • Year of Extinction:  1774

  • Reason for Extinction: Rats introduced to the island were believed to be the cause  for the extinction of the species.
     

528px-Aplonis_fusca_fusca.jpg

Aplonis fusca

27. Ara tricolor (Cuba Macaw)

  • Origin: Cuba

  • Year of Extinction: Last sighting in 1885

  • Reason for Extinction: The species became extinct most likely due to human hunting for food, cutting down of breeding trees, and feeding young birds to domestic animals.
     

28. Atlantisia podarces (St. Helena Rail)

  • Origin: Saint Helena

  • Year of Extinction: Probably shortly after 1502.

  • Reason for extinction: Since the St. Helena rail was a large, flightless bird, it was presumably heavily hunted by humans and other predators.
     

29. Bermuteo avivorus (Bermuda Falcon)

  • Origin: Bermuda

  • Year of Extinction: Although the Bermuda Falcon is known only from fossil finds, it can be considered that 1603 birds of prey were sighted on the island  Bermuda hawks were.

  • Reason for the extinction: According to current knowledge, the reason for the extinction of the species was the hunting of the falcon by humans, but also domestic pigs and other animal species that were introduced.
     

30. Bulweria bifax (Saint Helen's Petrel)

  • Origin: Saint Helena

  • Year of Extinction: The species probably became extinct shortly after the discovery of St. Helena in 1502.

  • Reason for Extinction: It is very likely that the species became extinct due to hunting by humans as well as other species introduced to the island.
     

31. Cabalus modestus (Chatham's Rail)

  • Origin: Chatham Islands / New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: Between 1893 and 1895

  • Reason for extinction: According to current knowledge, the species became extinct due to introduced animal species such as rats and cats. Added to this was the conversion of the habitat into sheep pastures, as well as the  Rabbits and goats were also kept in the habitat  destroyed.
     

32. Caloenas maculata (Liverpool pigeon)

  • Origin: Probably near the Pacific (Possibly pigeons described by Tahitian residents are Liverpool pigeons, but this is only a guess).

  • Year of Extinction: /

  • Reason of extinction: Although almost nothing about the

      Liverpool pigeon is known, it is assumed that the species is due         Human hunting died out.
 

33. Camptorhynchus labradorius (Labrador duck)

  • Origin: 

  • Year of Extinction: 

  • Reason of extinction:  
     

34. Caracara lutosa  (Guadalupe-Karakara)

  • Origin: Isla Guadalupe / Mexico

  • Year of Extinction: Last sighting in 1903

  • Reason of extinction: Probably the   The main reason for the extinction of the species is persecution by settlers, but the destruction of native vegetation by herbivorous goats is also a reason for the extinction of the species to be considered.
     

35. Carpodacus ferreorostris (Bonin Hawfinch)

  • Origin:  Ogasawara Islands / Japan

  • Year of Extinction: The last confirmed sighting of a Bonin's Hawfinch was in 1828.

  • Reason for the extinction: It can be assumed that the species died out due to the deforestation of the island but also due to introduced animal species such as cats and rats.
     

36. Chaetoptila angustipluma (Narrow Feather Honeyeater)

  • Origin: Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: Last sighting was in 1859.

  • Reason for the extinction: The deforestation of the island, hunting of the species, but also introduced predators probably led to the extinction of the narrow honeyeater.
     

37. Chenonetta finschi (Finsch's duck)

  • Origin: New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: Probably 17th century

  • Reason for Extinction: The reasons for the extinction are by no means known with certainty, but it is assumed that the species became extinct due to habitat modification, hunting by humans and rats, and food competition with rats.
     

38. Chloridops kona  

  • Origin: island  Lana'i / Hawaii (Fossil also from the islands  known to Kaua`i, O`ahu and Maui)

  • Year of Extinction: Not recorded since 1894

  • Reason for Extinction: The reasons for the extinction are unknown, but it can be assumed that habitat destruction, introduced mammals and              avian malaria led to the extinction of the species.
     

39. Chlorostilbon bracei (Braces Emerald Hummingbird)

  • Origin:  New Providence / Bahamas

  • Year of Extinction: Shortly after 1877

  • Reason for Extinction: The reasons are not known, but it can be considered that human disturbance led to the extinction of the species.
     

40. Chlorostilbon elegans  (Gould's Emerald Hummingbird)

  • Origin: The species probably came from Jamaica or the northern Bahamas Islands

  • Year of Extinction: The only and last specimen known to science was collected in 1860.

  • Reason for Extinction: Even if the reasons for the  extinction of the Gould's Emerald Hummingbird  are not known, it should be considered that the extinction was caused by the loss of habitat, the species' preferred forage plants and introduced mammals.
     

800px-Cabalus_modestus.png

Cabalus modestus

800px-CaloenasMaculataSmit.jpg

Caloenas maculata

800px-Chaetoptila_angustipluma.jpg

Chaetoptila angustiluma

362px-Chlorostilbon_elegans.jpg

Chlorostilbon elegans

41. Ciridops anna (Anna's Dressbird)

  • Origin: Main Island of Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: The last confirmed sighting is from 1892

  • Reason for Extinction: Reasons for the extinction of the Anna's Robe Bird are not known, but it is very possible that the destruction of the  Habitats, introduced rats and bird malaria led to the extinction of the species.
     

800px-Ciridops_anna.jpg

Ciridops  ann

495px-Ara_tricolor_edited.jpg

Macaw tricolor

B
C

42. Coenocorypha barrierensis (North Island Snipe)

  • Origin:  Little Barrier Island / New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: Probably shortly after a single specimen was collected in 1870.

  • Reason for the extinction: According to current knowledge, introduced Pacific rats and cats were the reasons for the extinction of the species.
     

43. Coenocorypha iredalei (South Island Snipe)

  • Origin:  Stewart Island / New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: In 1964, 2 specimens found on the island were found in  taken prisoner, who died shortly thereafter.

  • Reason for Extinction: The reason for the extinction of the species is the accidental introduction of the black rat  to the island in 1964, shortly before the species went extinct.
     

44. Colaptes oceanicus ( Bermuda woodpecker)

  • Origin: Bermuda

  • Year of Extinction: 

  • Reason for Extinction: Possibly led  the destruction of the island's cedar and palm trees along with introduced predators and competitors to the extinction of the species.
     

45. Columba jouyi (Silverband Pigeon)

  • Origin:  Ryukyu Islands / Japan

  • Year of extinction: the species was last sighted in 1936.

  • Reason for Extinction: There are no known reasons for the extinction of the species.
     

1280px-Coenocorypha_barrierensis.jpg

Coenocorypha barrierensis

Columba_versicolor.jpg

Columba versicolor

46. Columba thiriouxi  (Mauritius wood pigeon)

  • Origin: Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction: Probably against  1730

  • Reason for Extinction: Since the species was said to be easy to hunt, it is very likely that the species became extinct due to overhunting. In addition, there is probably the destruction of the habitat and introduced predators such as rats.
     

47. Columba versicolor (Bonin pigeon)

  • Origin: / Japan

  • Year of Extinction: The last sighting dates from  1889

  • Reason for the extinction: The combination of the destruction of the habitat with introduced animal species such as cats and rats probably led to the extinction of this species.
     

48. Conuropsis carolinensis  (Carolina Parakeet)

  • Origin: Eastern USA

  • Year of Extinction: The last wild Carolina Parakeet died out in Florida in 1927, while the last American population was in captivity  at the Cincinnati Zoo was already on  Died February 21, 1918. The final last animals of the only North American parrot species lived in Germany, but this population was shot down by a host within 2 days in the winter of 1929.

  • Reason for Extinction: The Carolina Parakeet became extinct due to human hunting, habitat deforestation, and presumed competition with European bees and their occurrence in groups.
     

49. Coturnix novaezelandiae

    (New Zealand black-breasted quail)

  • Origin:  Great Barrier Islands / New Zealand

  • Year of extinction: The last specimen probably died in 1875.

  • Reason for Extinction: The extinction was most likely caused by predators such as dogs,  Cats and rats, widespread fires and possibly diseases brought in by hunting birds.
     

50 . Coua delalandei (Delalande marooned cuckoo)

  • Origin: Nosy Boraha / Madagascar

  • Year of Extinction: The last confirmed sighting of the     Delalande's Coucous dates from 1834, this last known specimen was collected.

  • Reason for the extinction: The main reason for the extinction of the species was probably the almost complete deforestation of Nosy Boraha, in addition there were possibly introduced rats and the hunting of the animals by humans.
     

51. Cyanoramphus ulietanus (Brown-headed Parakeet)

  • Origin:   Raiatea / French Polynesia

  • Year of Extinction: The 2 last known specimens of the species date from 1773 and it is very likely that the

  • Reason for the extinction: Even if the reasons are not exactly known, the destruction of the forests, the hunting of the species as well as introduced ones probably led  extinction predators.
     

52. Cyanoramphus zealandicus (Tahitian Parakeet)

  • Origin: Tahiti, French Polynesia

  • Year of Extinction: The last report of the species is from 1844.

  • Reason for extinction: The species may have become extinct as a result of habitat destruction, hunting and introduced predators.
     

53. Diaphorapteryx hawkinsi (Hawkins Rail)

  • Origin:  Chatham Islands / New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: Based on a source from a letter, it is assumed that the species is still extinct until  existed in 1895.

  • Reason for extinction: finds  from remains of  Hawkins rails suggest that the species was wiped out by hunting by indigenous people.
     

54. Drepanis funerea (The Soot Mamo)

  • Origin: island  Moloka`i from Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: The sooty mamom was last recorded in 1907.

  • Reason for Extinction: The species probably became extinct due to habitat destruction and introduced predatory species such as mongooses and rats.
     

55. Drepanis pacifica (King's Duvet Bird)

  • Origin:  Main Island of Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: Presumably the species died out against  1898 because the last sighting was from that year.

  • Reason for Extinction: While the species was heavily hunted for its feathers, the main reasons for extinction are habitat destruction and disease.
     

56. Dromaius baudinianus (kangaroo island emu)

  • Origin: Kangaroo Island / Australia

  • Year of Extinction: The species became extinct between the year of scientific discovery, 1802, and the arrival of the first permanent settlers on Kangaroo Island in 1836.

  • Reason for the extinction: The main reasons for the extinction were probably the heavy hunting of the species and possibly also the destruction of the habitat by fire.
     

57. Dromaius minor (Black Emu)

  • Origin: King Island / Australia

  • Year of extinction: The last report of this species is from 1802, in nature it most likely became extinct shortly after, the last specimen of the species died  however, at the Paris Zoo in 1822

  • Reason for Extinction: The species most likely became extinct due to its being hunted by sealers for food
     

AudubonCarolinaParakeet2.jpg

Conuropsis carolinensis

Delalande's_Coua.jpg

Coua delalandei

Drepanis_funerea-Keulemans.jpg

Drepanis funerea

Drepanis_pacifica-Keulemans.jpg

Drepanis pacifica

800px-Extinctbirds1907_P40_Dromaius_pero
D

58. Dryolimnas augusti (Réunion rail)

  • Origin: Reunion

  • Year of Extinction: The species is only known from fossil finds, but it is quite possible that reports from a gentleman named Dubois from 1674 mention the Réunion Rail. Thus, one could assume that this species became extinct shortly after Dubois' reports, still at the end of the 17th century.

  • Reason for Extinction: The Réunion Rail's extinction was probably caused by overhunting and introduced predators such as rats and cats.
     

59. Dysmorodrepanis munroi (Lanai hooked beak)

  • Origin: Lana'i Island of Hawaii / USA

  • Year of extinction: The only scientifically collected specimen dates back to 1913, the species was last sighted in 1916 and 1918.

  • Reason for extinction: Between 1910 and 1920 pineapple plantations were established on the island of Lana'i, thereby destroying the habitat of the species. In addition, hunting by introduced predators such as rats and cats could have a major impact on the extinction of the species
     

60. Eclectus infectus (Polynesian Eclectus Parrot)

  • Origin: Tonga, and possibly also  Vanuatu and Fiji

  • Year of Extinction: The exact date of extinction is not known as the species has only been found subfossil. A drawing from 1793 might suggest this  Polynesian Eclectus Parrot. The species probably became extinct shortly after the drawing was made.

  • Reason of extinction: It stands to reason that over-hunting  and introduced mammals to extinction
    of the kind led.

     

61. Ectopistes migratorius (passenger pigeon)

  • Origin: Western and Central Canada and Western and Central USA.

     The passenger pigeon also migrated to Cuba in large flocks         and Mexico.

  • Year of extinction: The bird, which was once one of the most common birds on our planet, became extinct in nature as early as 1900. In the Cincinnati Zoo, however, the species survived until
    September 1, 1914. The last passenger pigeon was called Martha.

  • Reason for the extinction: The main reason for the extinction of the species was clearly the very strong hunting of the species by humans. While the species still had populations of 3-5 billion specimens in the mid-19th century, a few years later it was only Flocks of a few hundred passenger pigeons. In addition, important factors were
    Newcastle disease, habitat destruction and deforestation of forage trees, and the particular hunting pressure on young animals for consumption.

     

62. Erythromachus leguati (Rodrigues Rail)

  • Origin:  Rodrigues / Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction: The last report of a sighting of the species is from 1726. The species probably became extinct a little later, in the mid-18th century.

  • Reason for Extinction: Because the species was unable to fly and  supposedly also tasted good, it was hunted by humans.
     

Dromaius baudinianus

Dromaius_parvulus.jpg

Dromaius minor

Eclectus_infectus-MalaspinaExpedition179

probably Depiction of Eclectus infectus

OUR NEW PLACE

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. Let your users get to know you.

E
F

63. Falco duboisi (Réunion kestrel)

  • Origin: Réunion / France (Indian Ocean)

  • Year of Extinction: Since the species is only known from subfossils, it is hardly possible to say when the species became extinct. Possible reports of sightings of the species from 1671/1672  but are probably assigned to a different species.

  • Reason of Extinction: The reasons are not exactly known. the  Réunion kestrel became extinct, presumably due to the arrival of humans and the resulting consequences.
     

64. Foudia Delloni (Réunion weaver)

  • Origin:  Réunion / France (Indian Ocean)

  • Year of Extinction: The  Réunion weavers probably died out shortly after 1672.

  • Reason for Extinction: It is believed that the species became extinct shortly after the arrival of rats on the island.
     

65. Fregilupus varius (Hopfstarling)

  • Origin:  Réunion / France (Indian Ocean)

  • Year of Extinction: The last specimen of the species was shot in 1837. However, it probably only became extinct between 1850 and 1860

  • Reason of extinction:  
     

6 6. Fulica newtonii (Macarene Coot)

  • Origin: Mascarene Islands Mauritius and Réunion / Mauritius and France

  • Year of Extinction: There have been no reports of living specimens of this species since 1693.

  • Reason for Extinction: Although reportedly not good to eat, the species was probably wiped out by hunting
     

67. Gallinula nesiotis (Tristan island rail)

  • Origin:  Tristan da Cunha / United Kingdom

  • Year of Extinction: While the species was rarely found in 1873, it was probably extinct by the end of the 19th century.

  • Reason for Extinction: The combination of overhunting, habitat destruction and competition from introduced animal species such as cats, rats and pigs most likely led to the extinction of the species.
     

68. Gerygone insularis (Lord Howe Gerygone)

  • Origin:  Lord Howe Island / Australia

  • Year of Extinction: The last sighting of the species dates back to 1928, a survey in  1936 could no longer find copies.

  • Reason of extinction:  The species most likely died out due to the introduction of rats  and possibly also from sparrows on the island .
     

69. Haematopus meadewaldoi (Canary Oystercatcher)

  • Origin:  Fuerteventura, Lanzarote and upstream of it  islands  / Spain

  • Year of Extinction: The Last  Canary Oystercatcher was collected in 1913, last sightings are said to have been until 1940.

  • Reason for extinction: In addition to the species being hunted by cats and rats, the  The main reason for the disappearance of the species is probably the low number of  Invertebrates (food) on the beaches and other human disturbances.
     

70. Hemignathus lucidus (Nukupuu)

  • Origin: Island of O'ahu in Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: Yet  in the  It is said to be in the woods of the 1860s   Island have given many Nukupuus, but collectors are said to have found no more animals in 1890, so it must be assumed that the species became extinct at the end of the 19th century.

  • Reason of extinction: In addition to the destruction of the forests, presumably had the reenactment  introduced mongooses and cats are the major contributors to the extinction of the species. It is also speculated that the ultimate disappearance may have been caused by the introduction of avian malaria and avian smallpox to the island, although it is not certain that the species contributed to still existed at the time of its introduction.
     

71. Heteralocha acutirostris (Huia)

  • Origin: North Island / New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: The last report of a Huias is from 1907. 

  • Reason for Extinction: Although the exact reasons for the extinction of the species are not precisely known, habitat destruction and the lack of dead trees in which the Huias foraged were probably the biggest factors in the species' disappearance. Additionally the species may have been weakened by hunting and disease.
     

72. Himatione fraithii (Laysan-Apapane)

  • Origin: Laysan Island of Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: The species almost certainly died out in  1923 out

  • Reason for Extinction: For the mining of guano (bird droppings fertilizer) on the island, rabbits were used as food for the workers  placed on the island, which destroyed large parts of the island vegetation. In addition, devastated  in 1923 a storm Laysan which killed the last 3 remaining specimens.
     

Ectopistes migratorius

Hopfstar.jpg

Fregilupus varius

424px-Gerygone_insularis.jpg

Gerygone insularis

Nukupuu.jpg

Hemignatus lucidus

Huia.jpg

Heteralocha acutirostris

G
H

73. Hypotaenidia dieffenbachii  (Dieffenbach rail)

  • Origin: Chatham Islands / New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: The species most likely became extinct around 1872.

  • Reason for Extinction: The extinction is believed to be due to the introduction of dogs, rats and cats to the  Islands and the destruction of the habitat of the Dieffenbach rails.
     

74. Hypotaenidia pacifica (Red-billed Rail)

  • Origin: Island of Tahiti / French Polynesia

  • Year of Extinction: The last reports of this species are from the 1930s.

  • Reason for extinction: Since the species was unable to fly, it can be assumed that the  species was wiped out by the introduced rats and cats.
     

75. Hypotaenidia poeciloptera (Fiji Rail)

  • Origin: Fiji (Oceania)

  • Year of Extinction: There have been no reports of the Fiji Rail since 1973

  • Reason for extinction: 2 other rail species on the island were wiped out on the island by introduced mongooses, that's why  It can be assumed that the Fiji rail also disappeared due to these species, which do not occur naturally on the island.
     

76. Hypotaenidia wakensis (wake rail)

  • Origin:  Wake Island (Pacific Ocean) / United States

  • Year of Extinction: The last sighting was in 1945, a bird watcher who was on the island in 1946 could no longer sight a Wake Rail.

  • Reason for the extinction: The Japanese soldiers stationed on the island between 1942 and 1945 probably hunted the species to the point of extinction so as not to starve themselves
     

77. Ixobrychus novaezelandiae (Black-backed Little Bittern)

  • Origin: South Island of New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: The species probably became extinct in the 1890s

  • Cause of Extinction: There are no known reasons for the extinction of the species, but it is possible that the                Black-backed little bittern, like many other New Zealand species, have been wiped out by introduced animals and hunting.
     

78. Lophopsittacus bensoni (Mauritian Gray Conure)

  • Origin: Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction: The last sighting of the Mauritian Gray Conure was reported in 1764

  • Reason for Extinction: The species was hunted for food, which is believed to  became fatal
     

79. Lophopsittacus mauritianus (Mauritian parrot)

  • Origin: Mauritius

  • Year of extinction: The species was last sighted between 1673 and 1675, in 1693 it was almost certainly extinct.

  • Reason for Extinction: Although the species was not unable to fly, it is said to be a rather clumsy flier. So it was heavily hunted and most likely died out as a result.
     

80  Loxops wolstenholmei  

  • Origin: Island of O'ahu of Hawaii /  USA

  • Year of Extinction: The species reportedly died out  in 1930 out.

  • Reason for Extinction: The species is thought to have died out due to habitat destruction and disease.
     

81. Mascarenotus grucheti (Réunion owl)

  • Origin: Reunion Island / France

  • Year of Extinction: The species is believed to have become extinct in the early 17th century

  • Reason for extinction: Hunting, deforestation of the island and introduced species most likely led to the extinction of the Réunion owls.  
     

Laysan-Apapane.jpg

Himatione fraithii

CabalusDieffenbachiiKeulemans.jpg

Hypotaenidia dieffenbachii

800px-Gallirallus.pacificus.jpg

Hypotaenidia pacifica

800px-Extinctbirds1907_P7_Lophopsittacus

Lophopsittacus mauritianus

I
L

82. Mascarenotus murivorus (Rodrigues owl)

  • Origin: Rodrigues Island / Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction: The last report of the species is from 1726

  • Reason for the extinction: It can be assumed that the deforestation of the island, the hunting of the owls and introduced species, similar to the Réunion owl, led to the extinction of the species.
     

83. Mascarenotus sauzieri (Mauritius owl)

  • Origin: Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction: The species was last sighted in 1837, by 1859 the Mauritius owl had almost certainly disappeared

  • Reason for Extinction: Similar to the  other Mascarene owls, it can be assumed that the Mauritius owl also died out as a result of hunting, introduced species and the destruction of its habitat.
     

84. Mascarinus mascarin (Réunion Parakeet)

  • Origin:  Reunion Island / France

  • Year of extinction: The birds were last sighted in 1775, they could no longer be detected in 1804.

  • Reason for Extinction: It is considered very likely that the species was wiped out by hunting.
     

424px-Extinctbirds1907_P9_Mascarinus_mas

85. Mergus australis (Auckland Merganser)

  • Origin:  Auckland Islands / New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: Even before the  islands in 1910, the species had already disappeared in 1902.

  • Reason for Extinction: The introduction of pigs, rats, cats and dogs is believed to have been the largest contributor to the extinction of the Auckland Merganser.
     

Mergus_australis.jpg

Mergus australis

M

86. Microgoura meeki (Solomon dove)

  • Origin: island  Choiseul / Solomon Islands

  • Year of Extinction: The species was last known to have been sighted in 1904

  • Reason for Extinction: It can be assumed that the species became extinct due to wild dogs and domestic cats on the island.
     

87. Moho apicalis (curly-tailed moho)

  • Origin: island  O'ahu from Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: The last report of the species is in 1837, no more Dalmatian Mohos could be found by collectors who visited the island in the 1890s

  • Reason for extinction: It can be assumed that the species, in addition to the destruction of its habitat, was also  mosquito-borne disease became extinct.
     

88. Moho bishopi  (ear tuft moho)

  • Origin: Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: The last known confirmed sighting of the species is from 1904 from the island  Moloka'i. Despite reports from locals that the animals  up until 1914, the species could no longer be identified. Numerous searches for the species up to 1949 could no longer provide any evidence of the eared moho.

  • Reason for Extinction: The destruction of forests for agricultural pastures, the introduction of rats on the island and a mosquito-borne disease led to the disappearance of these birds.

89. Moho braccatus (Scale-throated Moho)

  • Origin: Island of Kaua'i in Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: The species was last reported in 1987

  • Reason for the extinction: In addition to the destruction of habitat, it is highly probable that imported rats, pigs and mosquitoes with a disease caused the scale-throated moho to become extinct.
     

90. Moho nobilis (Magnificent Moho)

  • Origin: island  Lana'i of Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: The species was last seen in 1934

  • Reason for Extinction: The combination of habitat destruction and disease most likely led to the extinction of the Prachtmoho, named for its beauty. In contrast, hunting of the species appears to have played little, if any, role.
     

485px-Choiseul_Crested_Pigeon.jpg

Microgoura meeki

467px-Moho_nobilis-Keulemans.jpg

Moho nobilis

91. Mundia elpenor (Ascension Rail)

  • Origin: island  Ascension / United Kingdom

  • Year of Extinction: Although the species could well up to the introduction of cats to the island in the year  1815 have survived, but it is quite likely that the rails  already disappeared after the arrival of rats on Ascension in the 18th century.

  • Reason for the extinction: Unfortunately, it can be assumed that introduced rats and later maybe also cats led to the extinction of the species.
     

92. Myadestes myadestinus (Kauaiklarino / Kauai clarinet bird)

  • Origin: island  Kaua'i from Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction:  The last confirmed sighting of a Kauaiklarino dates back to 1985, and even targeted searches in 1995 and 1997 could not change that.

  • Reason for Extinction: In addition to a mosquito-borne disease  the destruction of habitats and competition with introduced bird and carnivore species are identified as the reasons for the extinction. In addition, it is possible that introduced locusts as food competitors and perhaps also the effects of hurricanes could have contributed to the extinction.

93. Myadestes woahensis (Amauiklarino)

  • Origin: island  O'ahu from Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: The only one  known specimen of the species was collected in 1825.

  • Reason for Extinction: Although the exact reasons are not really known  is to be assumed that the kind by the destruction of the forests as well  the avian malaria died out
     

94. Myiagra freycineti (Guam Monarch)

  • Origin: Guam / Micronesia / Outskirts of the USA

  • Year of Extinction: The species probably became extinct in 1983.

  • Reason for Extinction: The species is assumed to have died out as a result of the introduction of the  Brown tree snake  died out
     

95. Nannococcyx psix (Saint Helena cuckoo)

  • Origin: St. Helena / United Kingdom

  • Year of Extinction: The species probably became extinct in the 18th century.

  • Reason for Extinction: Habitat destruction probably led to the extinction of the  St. Helena cuckoos.
     

96. Necropsar rodericanus (Rodrigues Star)

  • Origin: Rodrigues Island / Mauritius

  • Year of extinction: The last reports of the species are from 1726, in 1761 no more Rodrigues Starlings could be found.

  • Reason for the extinction: Although the exact reason for the extinction of the species is not known, it is assumed that in addition to the hunting of the birds, the destruction of their habitat and introduced species also led to the extinction.
     

97. Necropsittacus rodricanus (Rodrigues parrot)

  • Origin: Rodrigues Island / Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction: The species probably became extinct shortly after 1761.

  • Reason for Extinction: The species became   most likely from over-hunting  eradicated.
     

98. Nesillas aldabrana (Aldabra bush warbler)

  • Origin: Aldabra Island / Seychelles

  • Year of extinction: 1986 confirmed the unsuccessful search for the species that birds  since  was extinct at last sightings in 1983

  • Reason for Extinction: In addition to habitat destruction, the introduction of rats, cats, tortoises and goats may also have had an impact on the species' disappearance.
     

99. Nesoenas cicur (Mauritian Turtle Dove)

  • Origin: Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction: Although nothing more precise is known, it is assumed that the Mauritian Turtle Dove became extinct around the year 1730.

  • Reason for Extinction: A combination of deforestation on the island, overhunting of the species, and invasive species likely led to the species' disappearance.
     

Myadestes_myadestinus_Keulemans.jpg

Myadestes myadestinus

Myiagra_freycineti.jpg

Myiagra freycineti

355px-Necropsar_rodericanus_bones.png

Skeletal fragments of Necropsar rodericanus

Nesillas_typica_typica_1868.jpg

Illustration of  Madagascar Bush Warbler 
(Nesillas typica) from the same genus as the Aldabra Bush Warbler 

N

100. Nesoenas duboisi (Pink  Reunion pigeon)

  • Origin: Reunion / France

  • Year of Extinction: The last record of the species is in 1674, it appears to have become extinct in the early 18th century.

  • Reason for the extinction: In addition to the excessive hunting of the pink Réunion pigeon, introduced species probably also led to the extinction of the species.  
     

101  Nesoenas rodericanus (Rodrigues pigeon)

  • Origin: Rodrigues Island / Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction: Since very little is known about these from subfossil finds  pigeons is known, no exact statement can be made about the year of the extinction. However, an approximate period between 1726 and 1761 is assumed to be the date of the extinction.

  • Reason for Extinction: Although the species was readily hunted due to its tameness, the main reason for its extinction is the introduction of rats to the island.
     

445px-Columba_rodericana.jpg

102. Nestor productus (Thin-beaked Nestor)

  • Origin: Phillip  and Norfolk Island / Australia

  • Year of Extinction: In the wild, the slender-billed nester became almost certainly extinct in the first half of the 19th century, with the last known specimen dying in captivity in London in 1851.

  • Reason for extinction: Since this species was also quite trusting, it was hunted down and killed by convicts and first settlers for food supply. In addition, the thin-beaked nestor was said to be quite popular as a pet.
     

103. Nyctanassa carcinocatactes (Bermuda Little Crab Heron)

  • Origin: Island of Bermuda / British Overseas Territory

  • Year of Extinction: Although this species is only known from subfossil finds, it is believed to have become extinct in the early 17th century.

  • Reason for Extinction: The species is believed to have become extinct due to the introduction of invasive species such as domestic cats to the island and hunting by humans. There is also the thesis that  Lack of prey may have contributed to the extinction of the species.
     

104. Nycticorax duboisi (Réunion night heron)

  • Origin: Reunion / France

  • Year of Extinction: The species most likely became extinct between the last known sighting in 1674 and 1700.

  • Reason for Extinction: Since the meat of this species apparently tasted quite good and was also rich in content, it can be assumed that the species was hunted to the point of extinction.
     

105. Nycticorax mauritianus (Mauritian night heron)

  • Origin: Mauritius

  • Year of extinction: A supposed description of a bird from 1693 could apply to the Mauritius night heron, the species probably became extinct a few years later.

  • Reason for Extinction: The species probably became extinct due to human hunting.
     

106. Nycticorax megacephalus (Rodrigues night heron)

  • Origin: Rodrigues Island / Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction: The last sighting of the species dates back to 1726, which was then confirmed in 1761 by a traveler  found that there were no more Rodrigues night herons on the island.

  • Reason for extinction: The species is described as being easy to hunt, so unfortunately it can be assumed that this species also fell victim to human hunting.
     

107. Paroreomyza flammea (Kākāwahie)

  • Origin: island  Moloka'i  from Hawaii / United States

  • Year of Extinction: The species most likely became extinct between the years 1961 and 1963. Unfortunately, in 1979 she could no longer be found.

  • Reason for Extinction: The species probably died due to habitat destruction and a  disease off.
     

108. Pezophaps solitaria (Rodrigues solitaire)

  • Origin: Rodrigues Island /Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction: About the  closest relatives of the also extinct dodo is also not very much, but at least something  famous. The species is said to have existed in 1761, but was quite rare even then. In 1778  the birds were, according to one report, with great certainty  extinct, there  none of these solitaires can be discovered  could.

  • Reason for extinction: It can be assumed that the Rodrigues solitaires were very heavily hunted by introduced domestic cats and also became extinct for this reason.
     

Bone finds of Nesoenas rodericanus

Dünnschnabelnestor.jpg

Nestor productus

662px-Nycticorax_mauritianus.jpg

Bone finds of Nycticorax mauritianus

462px-Paroreomyza.flammea.jpg

Paroreomyza flammea

P

109. Phalacrocorax perspicillatus (spectacled cormorant)

  • Origin: Bering Island / Russia

  • Year of extinction: According to a report in 1741, the species was still quite common at that time, but since the breeding islands were settled in 1826, the species probably died out 3 decades later.

  • Reason for Extinction: The species was most likely wiped out due to overhunting after colonization of the island.
     

110. Pinguinus impennis (Great Auk)

  • Origin: Canada, Norway, Iceland, United Kingdom and more.....almost all coasts of the North Atlantic, bone finds extend even further south to Florida and Morocco, although the species presumably only migrated there during the winter period and almost certainly not brooded there.

  • Year of Extinction:  The last two breeding specimens of the Great Auk  were on the morning of June 3, 1844 by  Jón Brandsson and Sigurður Ísleifsson strangled, the last egg was crushed by a third party. The bellows were then sold. This extremely sad ending shows once again how disrespectful people are  deal with other living beings, because the reason for the final extinction of this unique species can only be described as unnecessary fun in killing.

  • Reason for Extinction: While the last two specimens of the species were strangled, there were of course other reasons these previously widespread and massive breeding colonies ultimately went extinct. Above all, great auks were hunted for their feathers, oil, meat and fat. However, especially in recent years, the main reason for the extinction was hunting for museums and collectors or trophy hunters.
     

111. Pipilo naufragus (Bermuda Ground Bunting)

  • Origin: Island of Bermuda / British Overseas Territory

  • Year of Extinction: The species probably became extinct around 1625.

  • Reason for Extinction: The Bermuda Ground Bunting most likely became extinct due to introduced pigs, rats, cats and the destruction of their habitat.

112. Podiceps andinus (Andean grebe)

  • Origin: Provinces of Boyacá and Cundinamarca / Colombia

  • Year of Extinction: The last Andean grebe was seen on Lake Tota in 1977. Intense searches  after the birds in the  years 1981 and 1982 were  unsuccessful.

  • Reason for Extinction: It is assumed that a number of reasons led to the extinction of the Andean grebes. Among them are the drainage, pollution and  draining the  water bodies and the disturbance caused by another duck species and introduced rainbow trout.
     

113. Podilymbus gigas (Atitlán divers)

  • Origin:  Lake Atitlan / Guatemala

  • Year of Extinction: Extinction of the species most likely occurred between 1983 and 1986.

  • Reason of Extinction: In 1960 were  Largemouth bass introduced into the lake, presumably in competition with Atitlán divers. In addition, reed cutting, increasing unrest on the lake due to tourism and boat traffic, the sinking of the water level in the lake as a result of an earthquake and drowning in fishing nets that have been laid out are the most likely reasons. Also had the killing of a game warden of the national park  certainly at least a small influence on the disappearance of the species.
     

114. Pomarea fluxa (Eiao spotted monarch)

  • Origin: Island of Eiao / French Polynesia

  • Year of Extinction: The last sighting of the species was reported in 1977, but a search for the Eiao spotted monarch carried out ten years later was unfortunately unsuccessful.

  • Reason for the extinction: Introduced species such as rats and house cats are suspected to be the main reasons for the extinction, as well as those that do not occur naturally on the island  Brown Breasted Nun  transmitted avian malaria also led to a sharp decline in the population. The destruction of the habitat by sheep cannot be ruled out as a reason for the extinction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

115. Pomarea nukuhivae (Nukuhiva monarch)

  • Origin: Nuku Hiva Island / French Polynesia

  • Year of extinction: The species was last seen in 1930, and by 1972 it was almost certainly extinct.

  • Reason for the extinction: In addition to introduced species on the island, the destruction of the habitat through fires and grazing livestock was the main reason for the extinction.
     

116. Pomarea pomarea (Maupiti monarch)

  • Origin: island  Maupiti / French Polynesia

  • Year of Extinction: After discovery  of the holotype in 1823, the species was never sighted again.

  • Reason for Extinction: The species most likely became extinct as a result of habitat destruction and introduced species on the island.
     

117. Poodytes rufescens (Chatham Warbler)

  • Origin: Chatham Islands / New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: The species is believed to have become extinct shortly after the last known specimen was discovered in 1892.

  • Reason for Extinction: The species is believed to have become extinct due to the introduction of rabbits and goats to the island, as well as fires and subsequent habitat destruction. Also probably have  imported cats also had a significant share in the extinction.
     

118. Porphyrio kukwiedei  

  • Origin: New Caledonia / France

  • Year of Extinction: Although the species is actually only known from subfossil finds, there is a report of a bird that appeared on  Porphyrio kukwiedei could be correct, so it seems possible that the species survived at least until 1860.

  • Reason for the extinction: Introduced species and human hunting probably led to the disappearance of these birds.
     

119. Porphyrio caerulescens  

  • Origin: Reunion / France

  • Year of Extinction: The species probably became extinct around the year 1730

  • Reason for Extinction: Since the species appeared to be very easy to hunt, it was probably wiped out by over-hunting.
     

424px-Extinctbirds1907_P39_Carbo_perspic

Phalacrocorax perspicillatus

412px-Keulemans-GreatAuk.jpg

Penguinus impennis

Pomarea_pomarea.jpg

Different types of Pomarea

Bullers_fernbirds.jpg

Lower bird: Poodytes rufescens

460px-Porphyrio_coerulescens.png

120. Porphyrio albus (Lord Howe purple fowl)

  • Origin:  Lord Howe Island / Australia

  • Year of Extinction: There have been no reports of living Lord Howe's purple hens since 1790, when the island was settled in 1834 the species was almost certainly extinct.

  • Reason for Extinction: It can be assumed that the species was heavily hunted by sailors and whalers who landed on the island, and  this led to extinction.
     

121. Porphyry mantelli  

  • Origin: North Island of New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: The only known record of this species is from 1894

  • Reason for the extinction: In addition to the change in habitat, the hunting of the birds by the Maori probably had a strong negative impact on the population.
     

122. Porphyrio paepae  

  • Origin: islands  Hiva Oa and  Tahuata / French Polynesia

  • Year of Extinction: The species undoubtedly died out only a few years  after 1937 out.

  • Reason for Extinction: Presumably human and invasive species hunting led to the extinction
     

Porphyrio caerulescens 

Porphyrio_albus_1873_edited.jpg

Porphyry albus

123. Prosobonia cancellata (South Sea Sandpiper)

  • Origin: Island of Kiritimati / Kiribati

  • Year of Extinction: The species became extinct around the 1850s

  • Reason for extinction: The species probably died out due to introduced mammal species such as rats and cats.
     

124. Prosobonia ellisi (Moorea sandpiper)

  • Origin: Moorea Island / French Polynesia / France

  • Year of Extinction: There have been no reports of living specimens of this species since 1777

  • Reason for Extinction: The species probably became extinct as a result of the introduction of rats to the island.
     

125. Prosobonia leucoptera (social walker)

  • Origin: Tahiti / French Polynesia / France

  • Year of Extinction: This species was also last seen in 1777

  • Reason for Extinction: Like the Moorea Sandpiper, this species became extinct on the island, probably as a result of introduced rats.
     

126. Psephotellus pulcherrimus (Parakeet)

  • Origin: The paradise parakeet was found in eastern Australia

  • Year of Extinction: The species was last seen in 1928.

  • Reason for Extinction: Extinction is due to a number of different reasons. The spread of prickly pears, changes in the frequency of fires, a disease, poor breeding success and, in recent years, problems with inbreeding in the remaining population probably led to the disappearance of the species. Killing too  of eucalyptus trees by humans  and a shortage of food probably played a part in the extinction of these beautiful birds.
     

127. Psittacara labati (Guadeloupe parakeet)

  • Origin: Island of Guadeloupe / France

  • Year of Extinction: The species probably became extinct between 1750 and 1800.

  • Reason for Extinction: The species is thought to have been wiped out by over-hunting.
     

128. Psittacula exsul (Rodrigues parakeet)

  • Origin: Rodrigues Island / Mauritius

  • Year of extinction: The last specimen of this species  was sighted in 1875, but the species probably only became extinct after a strong storm in 1876.

  • Reason for the extinction: Presumably, in addition to the loss of habitat, hunting of the Rodrigues parakeet by humans also led to the extinction.
     

129. Psittacula wardi (Seychelles parakeet)

  • Origin: Seychelles

  • Year of Extinction: The last known individuals of this unique species were shot in 1893, but a search just a few years later failed to find any of these parakeets  more to be discovered.

  • Reason for the extinction: In addition to the hunting of the birds, which are considered harmful to the corn plantations, the deforestation of the forests and thus the habitats for coconut plantations probably led to the extinction.
     

130. Pterodroma rupinarum (Saint Helen's giant petrel)

  • Origin: Island of St. Helena / British Overseas Territory

  • Year of Extinction: The species probably died out shortly after this was discovered  remote island in 1502.

  • Reason for extinction: The species probably became extinct due to introduced species and hunting by humans.
     

131. Ptilinopus mercierii (Redbeard fruit dove)

  • Origin:  Marquesas Islands / French Polynesia / France

  • Year of Extinction: The last sighting of the species is from the island  Hiva Oa from 1922, this was not the nominate form but the subspecies  Ptilinopus mercierii tristrami.

  • Reason for extinction: The species is said to have died out as a result of the introduction of the  great horned owls to the islands, as well as other introduced animals such as cats and rats.
     

132. Pyrocephalus dubius (San Cristóbal ruby tyrant)

  • Origin: island  San Cristobal /  Galapagos / Ecuador

  • Year of Extinction: Despite various attempts, the species has not been found since the 1980s.

  • Reason for the extinction: It is very likely that bird malaria, introduced parasitic flies and introduced rats led to the extinction of the bird  San Cristóbal Ruby Tyrants.
     

133. Quiscalus palustris (Slender-billed Grackle)

  • Origin: The species came from the region of  Rio Lerma / Mexico

  • Year of Extinction: The species was last seen in 1910, and it is thought to have become extinct shortly thereafter.

  • Reason for Extinction: The species probably became extinct as a result of habitat drainage.
     

134. Raphus cucullatus (Dodo)

  • Origin: Mauritius

  • Year of Extinction: The last known specimens of this species were named on an offshore island  Killed Ile d'Ambre in 1662, reports from the following years probably related to the Mauritius rails, which are now also extinct. The last reports are from the year 1690 at the latest. The dodo is now one of the most well-known extinct species as a symbol of the destructive power of humans, because this species was wiped out less than 100 years after its discovery.

  • Reason for extinction: Because the species is very large and  was tame, it was mainly hunted by sailors for food purposes, and many nests were very likely destroyed by introduced animals such as rats or pets.
     

135. Rhodacanthis flaviceps (Smaller  koa finch)

  • Origin: Main Island of Hawaii / USA

  • Year of extinction: The last report about this species is from 1891, already in 1893 the species could no longer be found.

  • Reason for Extinction: Although the exact reasons for the disappearance of this species are not known, it is believed that avian malaria as well as habitat destruction led to the extinction.
     

136. Rhodacanthis palmeri (Palmer's parrotbill)

  • Origin: Main Island of Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: The last record of living specimens of this extinct species is from 1896, unfortunately collectors attempting to locate the species in 1906 were unsuccessful.

  • Reason for Extinction: The reasons for the extinction of this species are not well known either, but it is assumed that avian malaria together with habitat destruction led to the extinction.
     

137. Sceloglaux albifacies (Barnacle Owl)

  • Origin: New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: The last time a living specimen of this species was reported was in 1914.

  • Reason for Extinction: Unfortunately, the exact reasons for the extinction are not known, but it is suspected that the habitat change caused by fires, grazing and introduced animal species became extinct.
     

138. Tachybaptus rufolavatus (Delacour's little grebe)

  • Origin: Madagascar

  • Year of Extinction: The last confirmed report of living Delacour's little grebes is from 1982

  • Reason for Extinction: The species became extinct due to a variety of reasons. In addition to nylon fishing nets, many of these divers drowned in fish that had been brought in, and the deterioration of the water quality of the lake due to sediments from deforested forests. The main reasons for the extinction are introduced animal and plant species, hunting and hybridization with other species
     

139. Threskiornis solitarius (Reunionibis)

  • Origin: Réunion Island / France, possibly also Rodrigues / Mauritius -> Mascarene Islands

  • Year of Extinction: The species has not been sighted since 1761.

  • Reason for Extinction: Hunting of the species was probably the main reason for the extinction.
     

140. Traversia lyalli (Stephen's panties)

  • Origin:  Stephens Island / New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: The species probably became extinct in 1895.

  • Reason for the extinction: Due to the construction of a lighthouse on the island, large parts of the forest were destroyed, possibly the lighthouse keeper's cat then caused the final extinction of the Stephen's slipper.
     

141. Tribonyx hodgenorum (New Zealand bantam)

  • Origin: New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: The species probably became extinct in the 17th century.

  • Reason for Extinction: The species probably became extinct due to rats and hunting by settlers.
     

142. Turdus ravidus (Red-eyed Thrush)

  • Origin: Cayman Islands / British Overseas Territory

  • Year of Extinction: The last confirmed sighting was in 1938, the species was definitely extinct by 1965.

  • Reason for extinction: The species died out with it  very likely due to the destruction of their habitat.
     

143. Turnagra capensis (South Island Piopio)

  • Origin: South Island of New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: The last sighting of a South Island piopios was in 1905.

  • Reason for extinction: In addition to the introduction of rats to the island, habitat destruction probably also had a major impact on the disappearance of the species.
     

144. Turnagra tanagra (North Island-Piopio)

  • Origin: North Island of New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: The last confirmed sighting of these birds is from 1902, after the year  In 1970 there were also no more unconfirmed sightings.

  • Reason for extinction: The species probably became extinct due to introduced rats and cats, human hunting and habitat destruction.
     

145. Upupa antaios (Saint Helen's hoopoe)

  • Origin: St. Helena / British Overseas Territory

  • Year of Extinction: The species most likely died shortly after the discovery of St. Helena in 1502.

  • Reason for the extinction: The exact reasons for the extinction of the species are unfortunately not known, but it is assumed that the species died out due to hunting by humans and introduced animals.
     

146. Viridonia sagittirostris (Hermit Green-throated Bird)

  • Origin: Main Island of Hawaii / USA

  • Year of Extinction: There have been no reliable reports of living specimens of this species since 1901.

  • Reason for Extinction: Since the habitat of the hermit green-cloth bird was destroyed for sugar cane plantations, it is assumed that this strong intervention led to the extinction.
     

147. Xenicus longipes (Forest slipper)

  • Origin: New Zealand

  • Year of Extinction: The species was the last time  sighted in 1972.

  • Reason for Extinction: The extinction of the species was probably brought about by introduced predators. The ground-breeding species was probably particularly hard hit.
     

148. Zapornia astrictocarpus (Saint Helen's Moorhen)

  • Origin: St. Helena / British Overseas Territory

  • Year of Extinction: This species of St. Helena also likely became extinct